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FAQ:
Frequently Asked Questions about
Jim Richardson's Stand-Up Comedy Workshops, etc.


Q: How do I get more "stage time"?
A:
The biggest mistake most comics make is spending too much time at amateur Open Mics and other such venues "trying to get my name out there."
In this instance, after months or years of treading water, at best the comic is performance strong and technique weak.

I call this horrible, ugly mess "Open Micer Syndrome" -- avoid catching Open Micer Syndrome at all costs since it is a known career killer!

;-)


Q: I already took a comedy class, and they offered up a graduation performance. Do you do something like this? And if not, why not?
A:
I have run my share of amateur nights and showcases.
As these low standard events are usually not goal-oriented,
they tend to be roadblocks to career development.

Comedy Classes can also have other unexpected results:
"Overly Critical Student Syndrome."
The very intelligent student of comedy can become hyper aware of technique, and eagerly point out the obvious errors of other comics, both amateur and professional.
If you plan to share your insights "to help out" other comics, expect angry reactions.
Become very good at blocking real punches.

8-)

This mistaken approach to professional relationships also puts up roadblocks to career development,
and delays both creating material and/or performing your new bits
the 50-100 times before paying audiences
required to set said bits.

Q: There are so many comedians out there today, how can I ever hope to succeed in this business?
A:
Both open-micer syndrome and overly critical student syndrome are approaches which are doomed to failure,
and are often easily identified by simply asking the newbie comic,
"How many times have you been paid to perform your 'comedy' in a professional stand-up comedy club over the past year?"

Luckily, there is a far better two-pronged approach that has helped both my students and clients to advance their career rapidly, and at the highest level —
These two approaches are best taken at the same time so you are always advancing with:
I. Spending 50% of your time mastering new techniques that directly result in your creating new material which is both original and very funny.
II. The other 50% of your time should be spent performing for pay in professional venues.
This way, valid audience reactions can be noted, and the act adjusted accordingly.
Instead of spending years getting nowhere fast, every week you are adding time to your act.

Q: What is it like participating in your Workshops?
A:
I waste none of your valuable time talking about the business of comedy in the early lessons.
You need to have an act before you can even begin to think about marketing concerns.
(But if you are still curious, see "Fundamentals," p. 378-388 and 440-510.)

Instead, this is what I have learned works after training over 1,000 student and professional comics, keynotes speakers, actors, etc.:


Jim Richardson's open letter to all stand-up comics,
business keynote speakers, politicians, ventriloquists and other solo acts:

What is missing in most of your presentations,
no matter how long you have been in the business?
1) Training: in more advanced comedy techniques.
2) Career Development: touching base weekly through one-on-one consultations with a qualified mentor
helping you stay focused on developing your always evolving act.

Everyone can get better!

Some more information you may find helpful:

1) Training:

Format for each of my "Home Study Program" (HSP) audio/workbook packages
which are the texts used in my 35 Lesson series of Stand-Up Comedy Workshops:
a) I present a writing or performance technique.
b) Then, I provide several world-class examples.
c) Finally, you have an exercise where you create your own new joke using that particular writing or performance technique.

Next step: move on to the next technique.

It is like there are lot of walls:
What happens when you finally break through your first wall?
You find your second wall.
Break through that second wall. And, then . . ..
Move onto your next wall, and break through that wall
behind which is . . .
. . . yet another wall!

;-)

The more walls you break through,
the more jokes you have.
. . . Soon, you will have a longer and/or much better act!

Also, look at this web page for a way to judge your progress up the comedy career ladder by clocking your laughs/minute aka L.P.M.:
http://www.stand-upcomedyworkshop.com/samplePagesAuditionLetter.html

2) Career Development:

I do this through one-on-one Coaching & Co-Writing your Stand-Up Comedy Act or Keynote Speech, either:
a) in person or
b) over the phone & through email and/or Internet video conferencing, all from the comfort of your own home or office:

Whereas my HSP expands your awareness of comedy and speaking techniques, it is general in its approach.

My "Coaching & Co-Writing" consultations with clients like you focus on your specific act or speech.

Target: becoming successful at the national level.

When would you like to talk more about becoming a client?

Please advise.

Thanks,


Jim Richardson
Comedy Coach & Co-Writer
jim@Stand-UpComedyWorkshop.com
415-877-4424
http://www.Stand-UpComedyWorkshop.com/consulting.html

How to ask your questions:
Please email your questions so Jim can post the most common concerns on this FAQ page: jim@Stand-UpComedyWorkshop.com

Page last updated: Tuesday, January 1, 2013 6:42 pm PST


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Home | Video | Coaching & Co-Writing | Order | About | Techniques | Register | FAQ | Contact
Studying Comics | Comedy Roots | Comeback? | Defense | Character mask | Robin | Censorship
Writer's block | Camcorder Coaching | Memorizing | Remembering | Setting a bit
Business | Business Cards | Your Web Site | Open Mics | Evil "Bringer Shows" | Audition | MC tips
Promo Packet | Contact media | Interviews | How to get BIG-$ Gig$ | Agents vs. Managers
Newsletter | Goodies | Auditioning: TV & Movie parts | Site Map: more tips